The silence of water in Leonforte’s Granfonte

“But the song of water / Is an eternal thing. / It is the deep-running sap / That makes fields ripen. / It is the blood of poets / Who let their souls / get lost in the pathways / of nature”: with these words Federico García Lorca celebrated the secret, incessant, infinite flow of water in his poem “Morning”.

In Leonforte, Sicily, water springs from two dozen bronze spouts every day of the year, except one: Good Friday, when even water stops in mourning for the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross, as the monumental Granfonte fountain silences its twenty-four mouths for twenty-four hours.

Leonforte’s old public drinking trough is 24.6 meters long and 2.55 deep. It was built by an architect from Palermo, Mariano Smeriglio, between 1649 and 1652, in the location of a preexistent Arab fountain.

When water resumes its course on Holy Saturday, hope appears to gush with it once again. And the verses by Cesare Pavese seem fit to describe the imminent Resurrection: “That street will open out, / The stones will sing out, / The heart will beat thud, leaping / like the water in the fountains”.

“But the song of water / Is an eternal thing. / It is the deep-running sap / That makes fields ripen. / It is the blood of poets / Who let their souls / get lost in the pathways / of nature”: with these words Federico García Lorca celebrated the secret, incessant, infinite flow of water in his poem “Morning”.

In Leonforte, Sicily, water springs from two dozen bronze spouts every day of the year, except one: Good Friday, when even water stops in mourning for the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross, as the monumental Granfonte fountain silences its twenty-four mouths for twenty-four hours.

Leonforte’s old public drinking trough is 24.6 meters long and 2.55 deep. It was built by an architect from Palermo, Mariano Smeriglio, between 1649 and 1652, in the location of a preexistent Arab fountain.

When water resumes its course on Holy Saturday, hope appears to gush with it once again. And the verses by Cesare Pavese seem fit to describe the imminent Resurrection: “That street will open out, / The stones will sing out, / The heart will beat thud, leaping / like the water in the fountains”.

Photos via:
http://rete.comuni-italiani.it/foto/2008/73992
http://www.flickr.com/photos/principatosalvatore/3243857929/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/26133871@N02/2477399777/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ayomtovian/3965814563/
http:///www.flickr.com/photos/lorca/4017888402/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lorca/4022131136/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sigi07/3218352224/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sigi07/7000906059/

The silence of water in Leonforte’s Granfonte

Leonforte (En)
Via Granfonte

WEEKLY POSTCARD

Most Read

The Great War Museum: history at high altitude

Author: Barbara PalladinoTranslation by Michelle NebioloOn the top of the Marmolada, at 3,000 meters of altitude, you’ll find the Marmolada Great War...

Palazzo Giordano Apostoli: neo-gothic inspiration

Palazzo Giordano Apostoli is located in Sassari’s central Piazza d’Italia. It was built by will of Giuseppe Giordano Apostoli in 1877, in...

Move To The Top takes you to the roof of the Dolomites

Author: Barbara PalladinoTranslation by Michelle Nebiolo On 4 July 2020, the cableway to Malga Ciapèla will re-open. Its short,...

Tenute La Montina, the realm of Franciacorta

Author: Barbara PalladinoTranslation by Michelle NebioloTenute La Montina is located in Monticelli Brusati (BS), in the north-east of Franciacorta, next to an ample...